Getting “curious” at Cherubs Nurseries

What’s so great about the childcare sector is that there are so many different ways for children to learn. We know that no two children learn the same so it is so important to ensure that, within our practice, we provide the tools for all children to succeed, no matter what they may be. Earlier this year we were introduced to the “curiosity approach”, a modern day approach to early childhood and childcare. It takes parts from Reggio, Steiner, Te Whariki and Montessori and is based around authentic resources, mindfulness and the engagement of all the senses. It’s about letting children be curious, take a lead in their learning and to use their imagination to learn about the world around them.

Once introduced our Managing Director, Susan, was onboard and wanted to implement this concept and run with it. When asked about the curiosity approach, she said “I really am looking forward to implementing the curiosity approach at all our nurseries. This new way of learning is something I am incredibly passionate about and I am so proud of our nurseries for already engaging so well with this new concept. I have even been out, visiting local charity shops and up-cycling retailers – ready to kit out all our nurseries.”

Initially, we thought it would be a huge job to adopt this concept at all 13 of our nurseries. However, on closer inspection we realised that, actually, we had already laid the foundations for this approach to be implemented. We have never been a fan of bright colours in our nurseries, we have always neutrally-decorated our nurseries and ensured that nothing was ever too “heavy on the eyes” – something that the curiosity approach is based around. Additionally, we have always had a strong CSR stance and ensured that we up-cycled where we would and made use of resources that would have otherwise been thrown away. Already having these practices well-embedded has meant that all our nurseries have been able to quickly pick up this concept and make real changes.

To further assist with our shift over to the curiosity approach we have now banned the purchase of plastic toys across all our nurseries, only purchasing them when there is not another suitable and “like for like” resource available. This really hasn’t been as hard as we initially thought and we have been able to create some fantastic toys and furniture with the assistance of our DIY colleagues and talented maintenance team. So far, we have seen some great results from the curiosity approach (pictured above) and the feedback from children, staff and parents has been a great source of inspiration to continue to build on the work we have done so far.

This month we completed a total curiosity approach overhaul at Cherubs Edwinstowe and have almost completed the same at our newest acquisition, Cherubs Ruddington. Watch this space!

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